Images de voyage

Aber Wrac'h

The Aber Wrac'h could be a tiny village and port placed on the watercourse Wrac'h within the commune of Landéda within the department of Finistère in France, placed in Bretagne.

The Wrac'h's supply is Trémaouézan. It travels through Ploudaniel, Folgoët, Lannilis and Plouguerneau and enters the ocean within the body of water between the Sainte Marguerite ground and also the promontory of Madonna Island.

Origin of the name
The Aber Wrac'h derives its name from the primary immersed rock of its channel, “Ar Gwrach” which suggests “the recent woman” (the fish).

An alternative theory is that the name comes from the “estuary of the fairy” which can be associated with the alleged Gallo-Roman bridge placed upstream of the watercourse mouth (ruins still visible today) named Bridge of the Devil.

See also: Aber and Inver as place-name components
British accounts of the eighteenth and nineteenth Century provide the town's name as Averach.

History
The u. s. Navy established a military service base on four Gregorian calendar month 1918 to control seaplanes throughout war I. the bottom closed shortly once the primary truce at Compiègne.[1]

Islands within the section of Aber Wrac'h
They following solid ground is additionally brought up because the islands of Lilia :

Cézon island and its Fort
Wrac'h Island
Stagadon island
Island of Erch
Island of the Cross
Recreation
The city could be a widespread location and base for sailing, windsurfing and kitesurfing

Aber Wrac'h
Aber Wrac'h
Aber Wrac'h
Aber Wrac'h
Aber Wrac'h: un four à goémon
Aber Wrac'h: un four à goémon
Aber Wrac'h: les dunes de Sainte Marguerite
Aber Wrac'h: les dunes de Sainte Marguerite

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